James Webb Space Telescope’s first images of Mars

Written by Mohit Kumar September 20,2022

The first images of Mars from the James Webb Space Telescope show the planet's eastern hemisphere in detail.

This image includes one of the Solar System’s largest impact craters and a lava flow from a long-extinct shield volcano.

On September 5, Webb took pictures with its Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument and measured data with its Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec). 

About 4 billion years ago, something enormous hit Mars, leaving a crater nearly 2,300 kilometres (1,400 miles) across and 7 kilometres (4.4 miles) deep near the planet's equator.

By examining Huygens's smaller impact crater, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter also found clay and carbonate minerals that are only found in wet environments.

It is believed that water once flowed through Huygens, carving a network of channels into the rocky surface.

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